How greenkeepers maintain the green

Golfers hope for the perfect playing conditions when they show up at a course, and if they’re lucky, they’ll be welcomed to lush green, freshly cut grass, even during hot and dry months. But there’s more to maintaining a golf course than mowing and watering. Expert greenkeepers implement specialist techniques to ensure golfers can enjoy […]

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Golfers hope for the perfect playing conditions when they show up at a course, and if they’re lucky, they’ll be welcomed to lush green, freshly cut grass, even during hot and dry months. But there’s more to maintaining a golf course than mowing and watering. Expert greenkeepers implement specialist techniques to ensure golfers can enjoy their game. South Africa’s greenkeepers bring their A-game to maintain golf courses—their work has been recognised as three of the world’s top golf courses.

Following international standards, Servest’s landscaping specialists have maintained golf courses around South Africa and Swaziland for more than 15 years. Every year, Servest selects two greenkeepers to attend the Players Championships in the USA and assist with green maintenance. During this visit, they learn latest insights and best practices, which they implement at the golf courses in Southern Africa.

How much water is enough?

The average golf course in South Africa needs between 1.2 million and three million litres of water each day. This is a major concern for our water-scarce country and its more than 500 golf courses. Fortunately, most golf courses, such as the ones maintained by Servest, use sustainable, waterwise strategies to meet their water needs.

Servest’s greenkeepers consult with clients and do an ecological assessment to recommend sustainable environmental solutions.

How to minimise water usage

In addition to using treated wastewater or captured rainwater, Servest’s greenkeepers also consider the following to curb water usage.

1. Choose the right site

Before developing a golf course, consult with the specialists. Ensure minimal environmental damage and maximum benefits to the community. Golf courses close to residential estates can be an asset to the area as they produce oxygen, clean the air, and cool the atmosphere.

2. Use trees strategically

On the one hand, trees can provide shade and reduce noise from nearby roads. On the other, leaves and branches can fall off during storms, or roots can damage expensive mowing equipment, needed to maintain course conditions. On top of that, some invasive trees soak up a lot of water. It’s best to remove invasive trees, break them down and use as compost to conserve water in the soil.

3. Be waterwise

Divide the course into low and high water zones, and plant indigenous shrubs and trees in low water areas such as the clubhouse and parking lot. In high water usage areas, like the turf, consider using gulf green or local veld grass that requires less water.

Between daily maintenance and following waterwise strategies, Servest’s greenkeepers are committed to maintaining courses that will provide players with the ultimate golfing experience. Get in touch with our specialists who keep up with environmentally friendly solutions and maintain world-class courses so you can attract more players and can set the gold standard for your courses. https://www.servest.co.za/our-services/

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